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LATEST > The Resurrection of Jesus, the Glorious Mystery of the Rosary
http://rosaryradio.blogspot.com/2016/08/the-resurrection-of-jesus-glorious.html
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The world is always in turmoil but today the most horrible, unthinkable things are happening all around it. For those of us who aren't in a war zone or worried about not having enough food to eat, our ordinary everyday lives can still be a challenge. What can we do to help? Prayer can be a source of help to some of us. To say the Rosary you need not be Catholic to join in. You don't have to own a set of Rosary beads. All you need is to prayer with us. ~Jan at Rosary Radio

The Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary

The Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary


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Recap of the Rosary: The MYSTERIES of the Rosary, which focuses on the life of Christ from the Scriptures. There are five decades in the Rosary represented by 10 Hail Mary's called The Mysteries of the Rosary. Each decade expresses an event in the life of Christ. The mysteries are Joyful Mystery of the Rosary~ said on Monday & Saturday-Sorrowful Mystery of the Rosary~ said on Tuesday & Friday-Glorious Mystery of the Rosary~ said on Wednesday & Sunday-Luminous Mystery of the Rosary~ said on Thursday.


Beforehand, you can say silently the reason for praying the Rosary.
We start with the sign of the cross. In the name of the Father.....

THE APOSTLE'S CREED, THE OUR FATHER,  3 HAIL MARY's,  Glory be to the Father, and the O my Jesus.
The First Mystery is the Baptism of Jesus in the River Jordan (Matthew 3:13-17).
Our Father -10 Hail Marys - Glory be to the Father - O My Jesus


The Second Mystery is Jesus at the Wedding Feast of Cana (John 2:1-12).
Our Father -10 Hail Marys - Glory be to the Father - O My Jesus

The Third Mystery is Jesus' Proclamation of the Kingdom of God (Mark 1:15).
Our Father -10 Hail Marys - Glory be to the Father - O My Jesus

The Fourth Mystery is the Transfiguration of Jesus (Luke 9:28-36).
Our Father -10 Hail Marys - Glory be to the Father - O My Jesus

The Fifth Mystery is the Institution of the Eucharist at the Last Supper
 (I Corinthians 11:23-26 ).
Our Father -10 Hail Marys - Glory be to the Father - O My Jesus
 Hail Holy Queen 
sign of the Cross





RECORDED Live at:  http://www.blogtalkradio.com/rosaryradio/2016/04/01/the-luminous-mysteries-of-the-rosary
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~Jan

St. Joseph, Husband of Mary



St. Joseph, Husband of Mary
Saturday, March 19, 2016
| Feast Day: Saturday, March 19, 2016
The Bible pays Joseph the highest compliment: he was a “just” man. The quality meant a lot more than faithfulness in paying debts.
When the Bible speaks of God “justifying” someone, it means that God, the all-holy or “righteous” One, so transforms a person that the individual shares somehow in God’s own holiness, and hence it is really “right” for God to love him or her. In other words, God is not playing games, acting as if we were lovable when we are not.
By saying Joseph was “just,” the Bible means that he was one who was completely open to all that God wanted to do for him. He became holy by opening himself totally to God.
The rest we can easily surmise. Think of the kind of love with which he wooed and won Mary, and the depth of the love they shared during their marriage.
It is no contradiction of Joseph’s manly holiness that he decided to divorce Mary when she was found to be with child. The important words of the Bible are that he planned to do this “quietly” because he was “a righteous man, yet unwilling to expose her to shame” (Matthew 1:19).
The just man was simply, joyfully, wholeheartedly obedient to God—in marrying Mary, in naming Jesus, in shepherding the precious pair to Egypt, in bringing them to Nazareth, in the undetermined number of years of quiet faith and courage.
Comment:
The Bible tells us nothing of Joseph in the years after the return to Nazareth except the incident of finding Jesus in the Temple (see Luke 2:41–51). Perhaps this can be taken to mean that God wants us to realize that the holiest family was like every other family, that the circumstances of life for the holiest family were like those of every family, so that when Jesus’ mysterious nature began to appear, people couldn’t believe that he came from such humble beginnings: “Is he not the carpenter’s son? Is not his mother named Mary...?” (Matthew 13:55a). It was almost as indignant as “Can anything good come from Nazareth?” (John 1:46b).
Quote:
“He was chosen by the eternal Father as the trustworthy guardian and protector of his greatest treasures, namely, his divine Son and Mary, Joseph’s wife. He carried out this vocation with complete fidelity until at last God called him, saying: ‘Good and faithful servant, enter into the joy of your Lord’” (St. Bernardine of Siena).
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From: http://www.americancatholic.org/

St. Patrick

St. Patrick
Thursday, March 17, 2016
        Lived(415?-493?) | Feast Day: Thursday, March 17, 2016

Legends about Patrick abound; but truth is best served by our seeing two solid qualities in him: He was humble and he was courageous. The determination to accept suffering and success with equal indifference guided the life of God’s instrument for winning most of Ireland for Christ.
Details of his life are uncertain. Current research places his dates of birth and death a little later than earlier accounts. Patrick may have been born in Dunbarton, Scotland, Cumberland, England, or in northern Wales. He called himself both a Roman and a Briton. At 16, he and a large number of his father’s slaves and vassals were captured by Irish raiders and sold as slaves in Ireland. Forced to work as a shepherd, he suffered greatly from hunger and cold.
After six years, Patrick escaped, probably to France, and later returned to Britain at the age of 22. His captivity had meant spiritual conversion. He may have studied at Lerins, off the French coast; he spent years at Auxerre, France, and was consecrated bishop at the age of 43. His great desire was to proclaim the Good News to the Irish.
In a dream vision it seemed “all the children of Ireland from their mothers’ wombs were stretching out their hands” to him. He understood the vision to be a call to do mission work in pagan Ireland. Despite opposition from those who felt his education had been defective, he was sent to carry out the task. He went to the west and north, where the faith had never been preached, obtained the protection of local kings and made numerous converts.
Because of the island’s pagan background, Patrick was emphatic in encouraging widows to remain chaste and young women to consecrate their virginity to Christ. He ordained many priests, divided the country into dioceses, held Church councils, founded several monasteries and continually urged his people to greater holiness in Christ.
He suffered much opposition from pagan druids and was criticized in both England and Ireland for the way he conducted his mission.
In a relatively short time, the island had experienced deeply the Christian spirit, and was prepared to send out missionaries whose efforts were greatly responsible for Christianizing Europe.
Patrick was a man of action, with little inclination toward learning. He had a rocklike belief in his vocation, in the cause he had espoused.
One of the few certainly authentic writings is his Confessio, above all an act of homage to God for having called Patrick, unworthy sinner, to the apostolate.
There is hope rather than irony in the fact that his burial place is said to be in County Down in Northern Ireland, long the scene of strife and violence.
Comment:
What distinguishes Patrick is the durability of his efforts. When one considers the state of Ireland when he began his mission work, the vast extent of his labors (all of Ireland) and how the seeds he planted continued to grow and flourish, one can only admire the kind of man Patrick must have been. The holiness of a person is known only by the fruits of his or her work.
Quote:
“Christ shield me this day: Christ with me, Christ before me, Christ behind me, Christ in me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me, Christ on my right, Christ on my left, Christ when I lie down, Christ when I arise, Christ in the heart of every person who thinks of me, Christ in the eye that sees me, Christ in the ear that hears me” (from “The Breastplate of St. Patrick”).


From: http://www.americancatholic.org/

St. Katharine Drexel

St. Katharine Drexel

Lived: (1858-1955) | Feast Day: Thursday, March 3, 2016

If your father is an international banker and you ride in a private railroad car, you are not likely to be drawn into a life of voluntary poverty. But if your mother opens your home to the poor three days each week and your father spends half an hour each evening in prayer, it is not impossible that you will devote your life to the poor and give away millions of dollars. Katharine Drexel did that.
She was born in Philadelphia in 1858. She had an excellent education and traveled widely. As a rich girl, she had a grand debut into society. But when she nursed her stepmother through a three-year terminal illness, she saw that all the Drexel money could not buy safety from pain or death, and her life took a profound turn.
She had always been interested in the plight of the Indians, having been appalled by what she read in Helen Hunt Jackson’s A Century of Dishonor. While on a European tour, she met Pope Leo XIII and asked him to send more missionaries to Wyoming for her friend Bishop James O’Connor. The pope replied, “Why don’t you become a missionary?” His answer shocked her into considering new possibilities.
Back home, Katharine visited the Dakotas, met the Sioux leader Red Cloud and began her systematic aid to Indian missions.
She could easily have married. But after much discussion with Bishop O’Connor, she wrote in 1889, “The feast of St. Joseph brought me the grace to give the remainder of my life to the Indians and the Colored.” Newspaper headlines screamed “Gives Up Seven Million!”
After three and a half years of training, she and her first band of nuns (Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for
Indians and Colored) opened a boarding school in Santa Fe. A string of foundations followed. By 1942 she had a system of black Catholic schools in 13 states, plus 40 mission centers and 23 rural schools. Segregationists harassed her work, even burning a school in Pennsylvania. In all, she established 50 missions for Indians in 16 states.
Two saints met when Katharine was advised by Mother Cabrini about the “politics” of getting her Order’s Rule approved in Rome. Her crowning achievement was the founding of Xavier University in New Orleans, the first Catholic university in the United States for African Americans.
At 77, she suffered a heart attack and was forced to retire. Apparently her life was over. But now came almost 20 years of quiet, intense prayer from a small room overlooking the sanctuary. Small notebooks and slips of paper record her various prayers, ceaseless aspirations and meditation. She died at 96 and was canonized in 2000.
Comment:
Saints have always said the same thing: Pray, be humble, accept the cross, love and forgive. But it is good to hear these things in the American idiom from one who, for instance, had her ears pierced as a teenager, who resolved to have “no cake, no preserves,” who wore a watch, was interviewed by the press, traveled by train and could concern herself with the proper size of pipe for a new mission. These are obvious reminders that holiness can be lived in today’s culture as well as in that of Jerusalem or Rome.
Quote:
“The patient and humble endurance of the cross—whatever nature it may be—is the highest work we have to do.” “Oh, how far I am at 84 years of age from being an image of Jesus in his sacred life on earth!” (St. Katharine Drexel)

The Glorious Mystery of the Rosary~ said on Wednesday & Sunday.

The Glorious Mystery of the Rosary~ said on Wednesday & Sunday.  
Pray Along here>                      
You need not be Catholic to join in here and you don't have to own a set of Rosary beads
either. All you need to do is to  along with us.
Prayers for the Rosary are: Making the Sign of the Cross, THE APOSTLE'S CREED, THE OUR FATHER, THE HAIL MARY, Glory be to the Father, and The O my Jesus, and at the end, the Hail Holy Queen.    
Before I start, I say silently the reason for this particular recitation, who I know who needs prayers, whether it be for fears and worries, and friends, family, and for people and situations around the world who are in harms way.
The First Glorious Mystery is the Resurrection of Jesus Christ (Mark 16:1-8).
The Second Glorious Mystery is the Ascension of Christ into Heaven (Luke 24:50-53). 
The Third Glorious Mystery is the Pentecost, the Descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles (Acts 2:1-4).
The Fourth Glorious Mystery is the Assumption of Mary into Heaven (Revelation 12:1-6).                      The Fifth Glorious Mystery is the Coronation of Mary as the Queen of Heaven (Revelation 12:1-6).
 Hail Holy Queen
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Blessed Daniel Brottier Sunday, February 28, 2016




Blessed Daniel Brottier
Sunday, February 28, 2016
Lived (1876-1936) | Feast Day: Sunday, February 28, 2016 

Daniel spent most of his life in the trenches—one way or another. 
Born in France in 1876, Daniel was ordained in 1899 and began a teaching career. That didn’t satisfy him long. He wanted to use his zeal for the gospel far beyond the classroom. He joined the missionary Congregation of the Holy Spirit, which sent him to Senegal, West Africa. After eight years there, his health was suffering. He was forced to return to France, where he helped raise funds for the construction of a new cathedral in Senegal.
At the outbreak of World War I Daniel became a volunteer chaplain and spent four years at the front. He did not shrink from his duties. Indeed, he risked his life time and again in ministering to the suffering and dying. It was miraculous that he did not suffer a single wound during his 52 months in the heart of battle.
After the war he was invited to help establish a project for orphaned and abandoned children in a Paris suburb. He spent the final 13 years of his life there. He died in 1936 and was beatified by Pope John Paul II in Paris only 48 years later.


Legacy

A residence hall at Duquesne University—an American university founded and administered by the Spiritan Fathers—is named Brottier Hall in memory of Blessed Daniel Brottier.
Brottier Refugee Services is a Non Profit organization set up to assist private sponsors welcome refugees to Canada.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Brottier


St. Maria Bertilla Boscardin - Lived: (1888-1922)










St. Maria Bertilla Boscardin

Lived: (1888-1922) | Feast Day: Thursday, October 20, 2016


Born 6 October 1888 at Brendola, Italy as Anna Francesca Boscardin

Died 20 October 1922 of cancer at Treviso, Italy many healing miracles reported at her tomb


Venerated 31 July 1949 by Pope Pius XII (decree of heroic virtues)

Beatified 8 June 1952 by Pope Pius XII











If anyone knew rejection, ridicule and disappointment, it was today’s saint. But such trials only brought Maria Bertilla Boscardin closer to God and more determined to serve him.Born in Italy in 1888, the young girl lived in fear of her father, a violent man prone to jealousy and drunkenness. Her schooling was limited so that she could spend more time helping at home and working in the fields. She showed few talents and was often the butt of jokes.

In 1904 she joined the Sisters of St. Dorothy and was assigned to work in the kitchen, bakery and laundry. After some time Maria received nurses’ training and began working in a hospital with children suffering from diphtheria. There the young nun seemed to find her true vocation: nursing very ill and disturbed children. Later, when the hospital was taken over by the military in World War I, Sister Maria Bertilla fearlessly cared for patients amidst the threat of constant air raids and bombings.

She died in 1922 after suffering for many years from a painful tumor. Some of the patients she had nursed many years before were present at her canonization in 1961.


From: http://hub.franciscanmedia.org/Home/pfSaint?sid=1884

http://catholicsaints.info/saint-maria-bertilla-boscardin/

For Children

For Children
I Pray The Rosary by Margaret Rose Scarfi and Virginia Helen Richards

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